ON THE JOURNEY

MICHAEL DUVAL, LEAD PASTOR

Perhaps not since the civil rights movement of the 1960’s has our country been as dynamically engaged in the struggle to move forward in the reconciliation conversation.  Right now our culture is in the midst of a great opportunity for real change.

 

When confronting racial injustice openly and honestly, it can seem overwhelming, but I am convinced that God’s church has the capacity for bringing transformation to efforts for racial reconciliation more than any other human entity or organization. 

 

The church is to be the heart and moral compass of a nation.  Racism won’t end in America until the church is reconciled first. Then—and only then—can it spiritually and morally lead the way.

 

I recently read:  “The racial reconciliation of our churches and nation won’t be done with big campaigns or through mass media.  It will come one loving, sacrificial relationship at a time.  The gospel and all that it encompasses has always traveled best relationally.  We have much to learn from each other and each have unique poverties that can only be filled by one another.  The way forward is to become ‘wounded healers’ who bandage each other up as we discover what the family of God really looks like.”

 

So, what now?

 

1.  Watch a movie?

“Just Mercy” (A film based on the true story of Walter McMillian who, with the help of defense attorney Bryan Stevenson, appeals his murder conviction.  Free to watch for the month of June on YouTube, Google Play and Amazon.)

“When They See Us” (A Netflix mini-series on the 1989 Central Park jogger case and the five males of color who were falsely accused.)

 

2.  Read a book?

“White Awake:  An Honest Look at What It Means to Be White” (by Daniel Hill)

“One Blood: Parting Words to the Church on Race and Love” (by John Perkins)

“Just Mercy” (by Bryan Stevenson)

 

3.  Participate in a conversation about these books in a multi-ethnic group?

 

4.  Get involved in a justice-related ministry/organization in our community?

 

5.  Share a meal with persons of a differing ethnicity to build relationships and mutual understanding?

 

What will be you your next step?

 

-Michael